It’s Not Rocket Science But It Still Takes Serious Engineering

By: Ryan Power

As you walk around trade shows, you will undoubtedly see the engineering medical market through a small variety of products or through concepts that come across your hands.  Products that will make you sit and think for a minute; some will not be around next year and others will already be copied and shifted off into hundreds of world markets by a vast variety of suppliers. After seeing the cycle of product development to market strategies and seeing these varies items come to life either in your own company or in the general market, it makes you put into perspective the tasks to meet a demand and provide a market need, even when the market has not yet realized they need it.

My first year working with Exact, I remember vividly the various projects I was involved with and the overwhelming tasks associated with each individual project. Looking back on it now, the workload has not decreased; the tasks are still present and as with everything, adaptation for survival is needed. To meet the intimidating engineering requirements of the medical industry, one needs a solid systematic approach to various key design and regulatory elements involved in product engineering.


  • Product Idea/ Concept
  • Determined Market Need
  • Product Viability
  • Product Performance
  • Product Regulatory Requirements (Various Geographical Markets)
  • Prototyping/ Tooling
  • Clinical Evaluation
  • Manufacturing Methods
  • Quality control
  • Distribution

 

 

Over the years, both large and small projects have come across my desk, yet all utilize the aforementioned building blocks for successful product development and integration into your portfolio. Now that the tools are in place and the process is set, the first and the last thing the client (outside or internal) will always ask, “So when will this be available in the market” or “How fast can we have a prototype”. This question although not immediately relevant to the product itself is detrimental to the product success. As most things in today’s world, there is no replacement for exceptional timing. Timing more so than other areas will result in a products success or failure. It is critical that realistic deadlines are created, but more importantly that they are then monitored and achieved.

 

 

In my early years with Exact, I was an unaware proponent of “Chasing the Rabbit” with my projects, often getting caught up in a minor area and not being able to move away from it to the larger picture at hand. It was with time, experience, and a great mentor, David Power, Exact Medical’s President and Senior Owner, that I was able to look deeper into projects and remain focused on the end task. This is now something I strive for and go to great lengths to teach anyone, in any position working on any product. Always begin with the end in mind.

 

 


Biography of Ryan Power

Exact Medical’s Vice-President and Junior Owner, Ryan Power works directly with all departments of the company at all facilities.  He works to direct and assist with all tasks from raw material sourcing for client’s projects to managing production and product development teams. Ryan also works with customers directly and assists the sales team.

Ryan Power joined Exact in 2013 and has had various responsibilities and titles through his years. Prior to Exact, Ryan Worked at Moog Inc. in the industrial department utilizing his electrical engineering education to repair/develop flight simulator Servo motors and drives.

Ryan is an avid recreation enthusiast, taking part in activates such as snowboarding, skydiving, aviation pilot, automobile fabricator and racer, fitness training, archery/ target shooting, and photography.

Ryan believes that the younger generation in the medical industry workface is critical for success in the adaptation for future innovations.  He is eager and determined to ensure that we at Exact adapt for the future.